800px-BradypusDid you know that a sedentary lifestyle leads to depression and anxiety? It’s true! And it’s not just mental health that is impacted by a sedentary life, but also physical health (which seems super obvious).

Earlier this year, I sustained a foot injury that completely changed my lifestyle. Where I had been exercising regularly and walking on my treadmill desk during my work day, now I spend most of my day sitting down. Even six months later, I’m struggling to get back to the active lifestyle I used to have.

I often assume when I’m struggling with something that my readers might also be struggling with similar challenges. So today I decided to explore a few of the ways that I can get moving more, in the hopes that you’ll be inspired to move more, too.

Challenges to Moving More

Sometimes getting yourself to move more is hard. Right now as I’m writing this, I’m sitting down. You know you should move more…so why don’t you?

Challenge: Injuries

My biggest challenge is a foot injury that I sustained six months ago. It’s been a frustrating road, and it’s been strange to be away from exercise for so long.

But…

#1 Way to Move More: SELF CARE Your Way to Health

I’m slowly coming to terms with self care like stretching, taking things slow, and wearing “sensible” shoes. At first, I was really distressed about the sensible shoes thing. I didn’t know that there are companies that make fabulous sensible shoes. I thought they all looked…sturdy. And as I’ve recently mentioned, I’m going through a whole fashion reboot (pun!) lately. And shoes have always mattered to me.

But there are adorable shoes that are still fashion-forward:

My point is, while we’re not looking at Jimmy Choos (nor should you be, if you’re actually thinking about the long-term health of your feet), when you know what to look for in quality footwear, you can have your cake and eat it, too (or have your cute shoes and walk, too).

Take things seriously

If a lingering injury is keeping you from moving, it’s time to take things seriously, get things fixed, and start moving in whatever way you can in the interim. For example, while I might not be treadmill-ready, I’m seriously considering a FitDesk v2.0. This bad boy is basically a bicycle desk, so you can ride a bit while you’re working. I can’t quite wrap my head around being able to write and ride, but at least I can get some movement in.

Become your own best advocate

Lately, I’ve been feeling an awful lot like doctors just want to prescribe stuff. Podiatrists want to give me expensive orthotics and medication, and sports medicine doctors want to stick a needle in my foot. I highly recommend that you become your own best advocate by researching whatever your injury is and doing whatever self care you can to resolve the issue. When I first hurt my foot, the sports medicine doctor made me wear a $500 walking boot for three weeks. When I saw the specialist, he told me the clinic doctor had given me the wrong boot, but said that a boot was the wrong treatment for my problem anyway. Did they give my money back? No. And just this past week, I was very interested to find out that a) there appears to be no solid research science behind orthotics and b) my podiatrist obtained preauthorization for the orthotics she prescribed while I was still in the waiting room, before anyone had seen me. So I really don’t have a lot of faith in the medical establishment at the moment and am most interested in what I can do on my own to solve this problem, since nobody else is solving it for me.

Challenge: Lack of Motivation/Inspiration

More often than not, lack of movement is a lack of motivation or inspiration. What’s most important to realize is that the decision not to move is a choice. And if you want to move, you will move.